When your child is diagnosed with a birth injury, it can be hard to hear what the doctor is saying. No parent expects their child to be the victim of a birth injury and it makes most people feel helpless and unsure. If your child’s been diagnosed with caput succedaneum and you’re trying to figure…

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What is Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a complex system of nerves located between the shoulders and neck. These nerves transmit signals between the spine and shoulders, arms, and hands, making them responsible for much of the muscle function and sensation in these areas. This network of nerves can be damaged when it…

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What Is a Cephalohematoma? Cephalohematoma, sometimes abbreviated as “CH,” describes a condition where a layer of blood forms between a baby’s scalp and their skull. This happens when blood vessels on the head are damaged and release blood that pools below the skin. Because this blood is on top of the skull and not inside…

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According to the Birth Injury Guide (a detailed resource for families who are coping with birth trauma), 6 to 8 out of every 1,000 babies are born with a birth injury. This means that approximately 1 in every 9,714 Americans sustains an injury due to medical malpractice or negligence at birth.  Many birth injuries caused…

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Some medical conditions are so rare that most people don’t know anything about them. This is the case with Horner’s syndrome. This disorder generally impacts one side of the face and has various different causes. Sometimes, Horner’s syndrome is the result of birth trauma caused by improper use of forceps or a vacuum extractor, shoulder…

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When a baby is born, it is supposed to be the most joyous time in any parent’s life. While it is still a happy time, there is nothing more devastating than know your baby has suffered some kind of injury because of a negligence-related act. This is unfortunately the case with infant cephalohematoma, a condition…

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Caput succedaneum is the swelling of an infant’s scalp, usually appearing shortly after delivery. It is most often caused by: A prolonged or difficult delivery Prolonged pressure from the mother’s vaginal walls or dilated cervix on the infant’s head Excessive pulling during the delivery Shoulder dystocia Misuse of vacuum extraction or forceps during an assisted…

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